Social and Community Service Managers

Career, Salary and Education Information

Top 3 Social Service Manager Jobs

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Top 3 Community Service Manager Jobs

  • Community Service Manager - Pegasus Residential - Henrico, VA

    One of the Top 50 largest management companies in the USA, were looking for forward-thinking, dynamic people to become part of our world-class family

  • Case Manager - Intensive Case Management - Southern California Health & Rehabilitation Program - Lynwood, CA

    The mission of Southern California Health and Rehabilitation Program (SCHARP) is to provide quality mental health and social services to vulnerable

  • Service Tech I - Legacy Partners - Anaheim, CA

    Perform light

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What Social and Community Service Managers Do[About this section] [To Top]

Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise social service programs and community organizations. They manage staff who provide social services to the public.

Duties of Social and Community Service Managers

Social and community service managers typically do the following:

  • Work with members of the community and other stakeholders to identify necessary programs and services
  • Oversee administrative aspects of programs to meet the objectives of the stakeholders
  • Establish methods to gather information about the impact of their programs
  • Analyze data to determine the effectiveness of programs
  • Suggest and implement improvements to programs and services
  • Develop and manage budgets for programs and organizations
  • Plan and manage outreach activities to advocate for increased awareness of programs
  • Write proposals for social services funding

Social and community service managers work for a variety of social and human service organizations. Some of these organizations focus on working with a particular demographic, such as children, people who are homeless, older adults, or veterans. Other such organizations focus on helping people with particular challenges, such as mental health needs, the presence of chronic hunger, and long-term unemployment.

Social and community service managers are often expected to show that their programs and services are effective. They collect statistics and other information to evaluate the impact that programs have in their community or on their target audience. They are usually required to report this information to administrators or funders. They may also use evaluations to identify areas that need improvement for programs to be more effective, such as providing mentorship and assessments for their staff.

Although the specific job duties of social and community service managers may vary with the size of the organization, most managers must recruit, hire, and train new staff members. They also supervise staff, such as social workers, who provide services directly to clients.

In large agencies, social and community service managers tend to have specialized duties. They may be responsible for running only one program in an organization and reporting to the agency’s upper management. They usually do not design programs but instead supervise and implement programs set up by administrators, elected officials, or other stakeholders.

In small organizations, social and community managers often have many roles. They represent the organization to the public through speaking engagements or in community-wide committees; they oversee programs and execute their implementations; they spend time on administrative tasks, such as managing budgets; and they also help with raising funds and meeting with potential donors.

Work Environment for Social and Community Service Managers[About this section] [To Top]

Social and community service managers hold about 138,500 jobs. The industries that employ the most social and community service managers are as follows:

Individual and family services 27%
State and local government, excluding education and hospitals 18
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 14
Nursing and residential care facilities 11
Community and vocational rehabilitation services 9

They work for nonprofit organizations, private for-profit social service companies, and government agencies. Social and community service managers work in a variety of settings, including offices, clinics, hospitals, and shelters.

Social and Community Service Manager Work Schedules

Social and community service managers typically work full time. They may work extended hours to meet deadlines or when preparing new programs; about one-quarter work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become a Social and Community Service Managers[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Social and Community Service Managers near you!

Social and community service managers need at least a bachelor’s degree and some work experience. However, many employers prefer candidates who have a master’s degree.

Social and Community Service Manager Education

A bachelor’s degree in social work, urban studies, public or business administration, public health, or a related field is the minimum requirement for most social and community service manager jobs. Many employers prefer candidates with a master’s degree. Coursework in statistics, program management, and policy analysis is considered helpful.

Work Experience

Work experience often is needed for someone to become a social and community service manager, and is essential for those wishing to enter the occupation with a bachelor’s degree. Lower-level management positions may require only a few years of experience, although social and community service directors typically have much more experience. Candidates can get this experience by working as a social worker or in a similar occupation.

Important Qualities for Social and Community Service Managers

Analytical skills. Social and community service managers need to understand and evaluate data in order to provide strategic guidance to their organization. They must be able to monitor and evaluate current programs as well as determine new initiatives.

Communication skills. Social and community service managers must be able to speak and write clearly so that others can understand them. Working with the community and employees requires effective communication. Public speaking experience is also helpful because social and community service managers often participate in community outreach.

Interpersonal skills. Social and community service managers should have good interpersonal skills. When speaking with members of their staff or members of the community, they must be tactful and able to explain and discuss all matters related to services that are needed.

Managerial skills. Social and community service managers spend much of their time administering budgets and responding to a wide variety of issues.

Problem-solving skills. Social and community service managers must be able to address client, staff, and agency-related issues as they occur.

Time-management skills. Social and community service managers must prioritize and handle numerous tasks for multiple customers, often in a short timeframe.

Social and Community Service Managers Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for social and community service managers is $63,530. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,770, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $108,960.

The median annual wages for social and community service managers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

State and local government, excluding education and hospitals $74,070
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 65,180
Nursing and residential care facilities 58,570
Individual and family services 58,150
Community and vocational rehabilitation services 57,570

Social and community service managers typically work full time. They may work extended hours to meet deadlines or when preparing new programs; about one-quarter work more than 40 hours per week.

Job Outlook for Social and Community Service Managers[About this section] [To Top]

Employment of social and community service managers is projected to grow 10 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations.

Much of the job growth in this occupation is the result of an increasingly aging population. An increase in the number of older adults will result in a need for more social services, such as adult daycare and meal delivery. Social and community service managers, who administer programs that provide these services, will likely be needed to meet this increased demand. Employment of social and community service managers is expected to increase the most in industries serving the elderly, such as services for the elderly and persons with disabilities.

In addition, employment growth is projected as more people seek treatment for their addictions and as illegal drug offenders are increasingly sent to treatment programs rather than to jail. As a result, managers who direct treatment programs will be needed.

Although this occupation is projected to have employment growth, gains could be limited by budget cuts in state and local governments. Social and human services rely heavily on government funding, and if funding decreases, services may not grow fast enough to meet demand.

Employment projections data for Social and Community Service Managers, 2014-24
Occupational Title Employment, 2014 Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24
Percent Numeric
Social and community service managers 138,500 151,700 10 13,200


*Some content used by permission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

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