Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Career, Salary and Education Information

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Top 3 Health Educator Jobs

  • OB/GYN Generalist Physician Faculty - Mountain Area Health Education Center - Asheville, NC

    We are seeking an individual who has a dedicated interest in resident and medical student education. In addition, our group is committed to a patient

  • CODING AND HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGER - Mountain Area Health Education Center - Asheville, NC

    This position will be located at the MAHEC Ridgefield Business Office location near the Biltmore Square Mall. Under the direction of the Director of

  • Executive Administrative Assistant - Mountain Area Health Education Center - Asheville, NC

See all Health Educator jobs

Top 3 Community Health Worker Jobs

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What Health Educators and Community Health Workers Do[About this section] [To Top]

Health educators teach people about behaviors that promote wellness. They develop and implement strategies to improve the health of individuals and communities. Community health workers provide a link between the community and healthcare professionals. They develop and implement strategies to improve the health of individuals and communities. They collect data and discuss health concerns with members of specific populations or communities. Although the two occupations often work together, responsibilities of health educators and community health workers are distinct.

Duties of Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Health educators typically do the following:

  • Assess the health needs of the people and communities they serve
  • Develop programs, materials, and events to teach people about health topics
  • Teach people how to manage existing health conditions
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of programs and educational materials
  • Help people find health services or information
  • Provide training programs for community health workers or other health professionals
  • Supervise staff who implement health education programs
  • Collect and analyze data to learn about a particular community and improve programs and services
  • Advocate for improved health resources and policies that promote health

Community health workers typically do the following:

  • Discuss health concerns with community members
  • Educate people about the importance and availability of healthcare services, such as cancer screenings
  • Collect data
  • Report findings to health educators and other healthcare providers
  • Provide informal counseling and social support
  • Conduct outreach programs
  • Facilitate access to the healthcare services
  • Advocate for individual and community needs

Health educators, also known as health education specialists, have different duties depending on their work setting. Most work in healthcare facilities, colleges, public health departments, nonprofits, and private businesses. People who teach health classes in middle and high schools are considered teachers. For more information, see the profiles on middle school teachers and high school teachers.

The following are descriptions of duties for health educators, by work setting:

  • In healthcare facilities, health educators may work one-on-one with patients or with their families. They may be called patient navigators because they help consumers understand their health insurance options and direct people to outside resources, such as support groups or home health agencies. They teach patients about their diagnoses and about any necessary treatments or procedures. They lead hospital efforts in developing and administering surveys to identify major health issues and concerns of the surrounding communities and developing programs to meet those needs. Health educators also help organize health screenings, such as blood pressure checks, and classes on topics such as installing a car seat correctly. They also create programs to train medical staff to interact more effectively with patients.
  • In colleges, health educators create programs and materials on topics that affect young adults, such as smoking and alcohol use. They may train students to be peer educators and supervise the students' delivery of health information in person or through social media. Health educators also advocate for campus wide policies to promote health.
  • In public health departments, health educators administer public health campaigns on topics such as emergency preparedness, immunizations, proper nutrition, or stress management. They develop materials to be used by other public health officials. During emergencies, they may provide safety information to the public and the media. Some health educators work with other professionals to create public policies that support healthy behaviors and environments. They may also oversee grants and grant-funded programs to improve the health of the public. Some participate in statewide and local committees dealing with topics such as aging.
  • In nonprofits, health educators create programs and materials about health issues faced by the community that they serve. They help organizations obtain funding and other resources. They educate policymakers about ways to improve public health and work on securing grant funding for programs to promote health and disease awareness. Many nonprofits focus on a particular disease or audience, so health educators in these organizations limit programs to that specific topic or audience.
  • In private businesses, health educators identify common health problems among employees and create programs to improve health. They work to develop incentives for employees to adopt healthy behaviors, such as losing weight or controlling cholesterol. Health educators recommend changes in the workplace to improve employee health, such as creating smoke-free areas.

Community health workers have an in-depth knowledge of the communities they serve. Within their community, they identify health-related issues, collect data, and discuss health concerns with the people they serve. For example, they may help eligible residents of a neighborhood enroll in programs such as Medicaid or Medicare and explain the benefits that these programs offer. Community health workers address any barriers to care and provide referrals for such needs as food, housing, education, and mental health services

Community health workers share information with health educators and healthcare providers so that health educators can create new programs or adjust existing programs or events to better suit the needs of the community. Community health workers also advocate for the health needs of community members. In addition, they conduct outreach to engage community residents, assist residents with health system navigation, and to improve care coordination.

Work Environment for Health Educators and Community Health Workers[About this section] [To Top]

Community health workers hold about 57,500 jobs. The largest employers of community health workers are as follows:

Individual and family services 18%
Government 16
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 14
Hospitals; state, local, and private 10
Outpatient care centers 10

Health educators hold about 61,000 jobs. The largest employers of health educators are as follows:

Hospitals; state, local, and private 23%
Government 22
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 9
Outpatient care centers 8
Individual and family services 7

Although most health educators work in offices, they may spend a lot of time away from the office to carry out programs or attend meetings.

Community health workers may spend much of their time in the field, communicating with community members, holding events, and collecting data.

Health Educator and Community Health Worker Work Schedules

Most health educators and community health workers work full time. They may need to work nights and weekends to attend programs or meetings.

How to Become an Health Educator or Community Health Worker[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Health Educators and Community Health Workers near you!

Health educators need at least bachelor's degree. Some employers require the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential.

Community health workers need at least a high school diploma and must complete a brief period of on-the-job training. Some states have certification programs for community health workers.

Education for Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Health educators need at least a bachelor's degree in health education or health promotion. Students learn theories and methods of health behavior and health education and gain the knowledge and skills they will need to develop health education materials and programs. Most programs include an internship.

Some health educator positions require candidates to have a master's or doctoral degree. Graduate programs are commonly in community health education, school health education, public health education, or health promotion. A variety of undergraduate majors may be acceptable for entry to a master's degree program.

Community health workers need at least a high school diploma, although some jobs may require some postsecondary education. Education programs may lead to a 1-year certificate or a 2-year associate's degree and cover topics such as wellness, ethics, and cultural awareness.

Health Educator and Community Health Worker Training

Community health workers typically complete a brief period of on-the-job training. Training often covers core competencies, such as communication or outreach skills, and information about the specific health topics that they will be focusing on. For example, community health workers who work with Alzheimer's patients may learn about how to communicate effectively with patients dealing with dementia.

Other Experience for Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Community health workers usually have some knowledge of a specific community, culture, medical condition, or disability. The ability to speak a foreign language may be helpful.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Some employers require health educators to obtain the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential, which is offered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

Candidates must pass an exam that is aimed at entry-level health educators who have completed at least a bachelor's degree. To maintain their certification, they must complete 75 hours of continuing education every 5 years. There is also the Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES) credential for health educators with advanced education and experience.

Most states do not require community health workers to obtain certification, however, voluntary certification exists or is being considered or developed in a number of states. Requirements vary but may include completing an approved training program. For more information, contact your state's board of health, nursing, or human services.

Important Qualities for Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Analytical skills. Health educators collect and analyze data in order to evaluate programs and to determine the needs of the people they serve.

Instructional skills. Health educators and community health workers should be comfortable with public speaking so that they can lead programs, teach classes, and facilitate discussion with clients and families.

Interpersonal skills. Health educators and community health workers interact with many people from a variety of backgrounds. They must be good listeners and be culturally sensitive to respond to the needs of the people they serve.

Problem-solving skills. Health educators and community health workers must think creatively about how to improve the health of the community through health education programs. In addition, they may need to solve problems that arise in planning programs, such as changes to their budget or resistance from the community they are serving.

Writing skills. Health educators and community health workers develop written materials to convey health-related information. Health educators also write proposals to develop programs and apply for funding.

Health Educator and Community Health Worker Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for community health workers is $37,330. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $23,620, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $63,880.

The median annual wage for health educators is $53,070. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $30,400, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $95,730.

The median annual wages for community health workers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Hospitals; state, local, and private $45,210
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 40,210
Government 39,470
Individual and family services 35,090
Outpatient care centers 33,420

The median annual wages for health educators in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Hospitals; state, local, and private $62,650
Government 55,110
Outpatient care centers 50,650
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 46,370
Individual and family services 39,190

Most health educators and community health workers work full time. They may need to work nights and weekends to attend programs or meetings.

Job Outlook for Health Educators and Community Health Workers[About this section] [To Top]

Overall employment of health educators and community health workers is projected to grow 16 percent over the next ten years, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be driven by efforts to improve health outcomes and to reduce healthcare costs by teaching people healthy behaviors and explaining how to use available healthcare services.

Governments, healthcare providers, social services providers want to find ways to improve the quality of care and health outcomes, while reducing costs. This should increase demand for health educators and community health workers because they teach people how to live healthy lives and how to avoid costly diseases and medical procedures.

Job Prospects for Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Community health workers who have completed a formal education program and those who have experience working with a specific population may have more favorable job prospects. In addition, opportunities may be better for candidates who speak a foreign language and understand the culture of the community that they intend to serve.

Health educators may improve their job prospects by obtaining a certification.

Employment projections data for Health Educators and Community Health Workers, 2016-26
Occupational Title Employment, 2016 Projected Employment, 2026 Change, 2016-26
Percent Numeric
Health educators and community health workers 118,500 137,700 16 19,200
  Health educators 61,000 69,900 14 8,800
  Community health workers 57,500 67,800 18 10,400


*Some content used by permission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

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