Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Career, Salary and Education Information

Following is everything you need to know about a career as an aircraft and avionics equipment mechanic with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career:

Top 3 Aircraft Mechanic Jobs

  • Aircraft Structures Mechanic - VT San Antonio Aerospace - San Antonio, TX

  • Sr. Mechanical Design Engineer - General Atomics - San Diego, CA

    Under limited supervision, this position will conduct structural design, analysis, and supervision of fabrication and installation of system

  • Aircraft Mechanic Helper - Department of the Air Force - Washington, DC

    In addition, ARTs are required to maintain active membership in an Air Force Reserve unit so long as they occupy Air Reserve Technician positions. As

See all Aircraft Mechanic jobs

Top 3 Avionic Mechanic Jobs

  • Electro-mechanical Engineer - Aero Engineering Support Group, LLC - Kissimmee, FL

    Must have Electrical / Electronics & Mechanical experience. Full time work, salary, excellent benefits, Relocation, Live in warm Orlando

  • UH-60 Avionics/Electrician Mechanic - Support Systems Associates, Inc. - Guntersville, AL

    This operation is currently executing multiple programs with structural and electrical fabrication, kitting, final assembly, and aircraft

  • A&P Avionics Mechanic / - Lockheed Martin Corporation - Goodyear, AZ

    Lockheed Martin values your skills, training and education. Come and experience your future! Full time aircraft mechanic for Piston GA and

See all Avionic Mechanic jobs

What Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians Do[About this section] [To Top]

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft.

Duties of Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Aircraft mechanics typically do the following:

  • Diagnose mechanical or electrical problems
  • Repair wings, brakes, electrical systems, and other aircraft components
  • Replace defective parts, using hand tools or power tools
  • Examine replacement aircraft parts for defects
  • Read maintenance manuals to identify repair procedures
  • Test aircraft parts with gauges and other diagnostic equipment
  • Inspect completed work to ensure that it meets performance standards
  • Keep records of maintenance and repair work

Avionics technicians typically do the following:

  • Test electronic instruments, using circuit testers, oscilloscopes, and voltmeters
  • Interpret flight test data to diagnose malfunctions and performance problems
  • Assemble components, such as electrical controls and junction boxes, and install software
  • Install instrument panels, using hand tools, power tools, and soldering irons
  • Repair or replace malfunctioning components
  • Keep records of maintenance and repair work

Airplanes require reliable parts and maintenance in order to fly safely. To keep an airplane in operating condition, aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians perform scheduled maintenance, make repairs, and complete inspections. They must follow detailed regulations set by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that dictate maintenance schedules for different operations.

Many mechanics are generalists and work on many different types of aircraft, such as jets, piston-driven airplanes, and helicopters. Others specialize in one section, such as the engine, hydraulic system, or electrical system, of a particular type of aircraft. In independent repair shops, mechanics usually inspect and repair many types of aircraft.

The following are examples of types of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians:

Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) mechanics are certified generalist mechanics who can independently perform many maintenance and alteration tasks on aircraft. A&P mechanics repair and maintain most parts of an aircraft, including the engines, landing gear, brakes, and air-conditioning system. Some specialized activities require additional experience and certification.

Maintenance schedules for aircraft may be based on hours flown, days since the last inspection, trips flown, or a combination of these factors. Maintenance also may need to be done at other times to address specific issues recognized by mechanics or manufacturers.

Mechanics use precision instruments to measure wear and identify defects. They may use x rays or magnetic or ultrasonic inspection equipment to discover cracks that cannot be seen on a plane's exterior. They check for corrosion, distortion, and cracks in the aircraft's main body, wings, and tail. They then repair the metal, fabric, wood, or composite materials that make up the airframe and skin.

After completing all repairs, mechanics test the equipment to ensure that it works properly and record all maintenance completed on an aircraft.

Avionics technicians are specialists who repair and maintain a plane's electronic instruments, such as radio communication devices and equipment, radar systems, and navigation aids. As the use of digital technology increases, more time is spent maintaining computer systems. The ability to repair and maintain many avionics and flight instrument systems is granted through the Airframe rating, but other licenses or certifications may be needed as well.

Designated airworthiness representatives (DARs) examine, inspect, and test aircraft for airworthiness. They issue airworthiness certificates, which aircraft must have to fly. There are two types of DARs: manufacturing DARs and maintenance DARs.

Inspection authorized (IA) mechanics are mechanics who have both Airframe and Powerplant certification and may perform inspections on aircraft and return them to service. IA mechanics are able to do a wider variety of maintenance activities and alterations than any other type of maintenance personnel. They can do comprehensive annual inspections or return aircraft to service after a major repair.

Repairmen certificate holders may or may not have the A&P certificate or other certificates. Repairmen certificates are issued by certified repair stations to aviation maintenance personnel, and the certificates allow them to do specific duties. Repairmen certificates are valid only while the mechanic works at the issuing repair center and are not transferable to other employers.

Work Environment for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Aircraft mechanics and service technicians hold about 132,000 jobs. The largest employers of aircraft mechanics and service technicians are as follows:

Support activities for air transportation 30%
Scheduled air transportation 22
Aerospace product and parts manufacturing 15
Federal government, excluding postal service 13
Nonscheduled air transportation 5

Avionics technicians hold about 17,500 jobs. The largest employers of avionics technicians are as follows:

Aerospace product and parts manufacturing 30%
Support activities for air transportation 30
Federal government 11
Scheduled air transportation 9
Professional, scientific, and technical services 5

Mechanics and technicians work in hangars, in repair stations, or on airfields. They must meet strict deadlines while following safety standards.

Most mechanics and technicians work near major airports. Mechanics may work outside on the airfield, or in climate-controlled shops and hangars. Civilian mechanics employed by the U.S. Armed Forces work on military installations.

Injuries and Illnesses for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians experience rates of injuries and illnesses that are higher than the national average.

Mechanics and technicians often lift heavy objects, handle dangerous chemicals, or operate large power tools. They may work on scaffolds or ladders, and noise and vibrations are common, especially when engines are being tested. However, mechanics take precautions against injuries, such as wearing ear protection and brightly colored vests to ensure that they are seen when working around large aircraft.

Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic and Technician Work Schedules

Mechanics and technicians usually work full time on rotating 8-hour shifts. Overtime and weekend work are common.

How to Become an Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic or Technician[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians near you!

Some aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians learn their trade at an Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved aviation maintenance technician school. Others are trained on the job or learn through training in the military. Aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians typically are certified by the FAA.

Education for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Aircraft mechanics and service technicians typically enter the occupation after attending a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school. These schools award a certificate of completion that the FAA recognizes as an alternative to the experience requirements stated in regulations. The schools also grant holders the right to take the relevant FAA exams.

Avionics technicians typically earn an associate's degree before entering the occupation. Aircraft controls, systems, and flight instruments have become increasingly digital and computerized. Workers who have the proper background in aviation flight instruments or computer repair are needed to maintain these complex systems

Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic and Technician Training

Some aircraft mechanics and service technicians enter the occupation with a high school diploma or equivalent and receive on-the-job training to learn their skills and to be able to pass the FAA exams. Aviation maintenance personnel who are not certified by the FAA work under supervision until they have enough experience and knowledge and become certified.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

The FAA requires that aircraft maintenance be done either by a certified mechanic with the appropriate ratings or authorizations or under the supervision of such a mechanic.

The FAA offers separate certifications for bodywork (Airframe mechanics, or "A") and engine work (Powerplant mechanics, or "P"), but employers may prefer to hire mechanics who have both Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) ratings. The A&P ratings generally certify that aviation mechanics meet basic knowledge and ability standards.

Mechanics must be at least 18 years of age, be fluent in English, and have 30 months of experience to qualify for either the A or the P rating or both (the A&P rating). Completion of a program at a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school can substitute for the experience requirement and shorten the time requirements for becoming eligible to take the FAA exams.

Applicants must pass written, oral, and practical exams that demonstrate the required skills within a timeframe of 2 years.

To keep their certification, mechanics must have completed relevant repair or maintenance work within the previous 24 months. To fulfill this requirement, mechanics may take classes from their employer, a school, or an aircraft manufacturer.

The Inspection Authorization (IA) is available to mechanics who have had their A&P ratings for at least 3 years and meet other requirements. These mechanics are able to review and approve many major repairs and alterations.

Avionics technicians typically are certified through a repair station for the specific work they perform on aircraft, or they hold the Airframe rating to work on an aircraft's electronic and flight instrument systems. An Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) certification is available through the National Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT). It certifies that aviation mechanics have a basic level of knowledge in the subject area, but it is not required by the FAA for any specific tasks. Avionics technicians who work on communications equipment may need to have the proper radiotelephone operator certification issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Work Experience in a Related Occupation for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Some avionics technicians begin their careers as aircraft mechanics and service technicians. As aircraft mechanics and service technicians gain experience, they may attend classes or otherwise choose to pursue additional certifications that grant privileges to work on specialized flight instruments. Eventually, they may become avionics technicians who work exclusively on flight instruments.

Advancement for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

As aircraft mechanics gain experience, they may advance to lead mechanic, lead inspector, or shop supervisor. Opportunities to advance may be best for those who have an inspection authorization (IA). Mechanics with broad experience in maintenance and repair may become inspectors or examiners for the FAA.

Important Qualities for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Detail oriented. Mechanics and technicians need to adjust airplane parts to exact specifications. For example, they often use precision tools to tighten wheel bolts to a specified tension.

Dexterity. Mechanics and technicians need to coordinate the movement of their fingers and hands in order to grasp, manipulate, or assemble parts.

Observational skills. Mechanics and technicians must recognize engine noises, read gauges, and collect other information to determine whether an aircraft's systems are working properly.

Strength. Mechanics and technicians may carry or move heavy equipment or aircraft parts, climb on airplanes, balance, and reach without falling.

Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic and Technician Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for aircraft mechanics and service technicians is $60,170. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $35,960, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $87,880.

The median annual wage for avionics technicians is $60,760. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $39,510, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $83,260.

The median annual wages for aircraft mechanics and service technicians in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Scheduled air transportation $71,810
Aerospace product and parts manufacturing 63,810
Federal government, excluding postal service 57,140
Nonscheduled air transportation 56,930
Support activities for air transportation 53,410

The median annual wages for avionics technicians in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Scheduled air transportation $70,810
Professional, scientific, and technical services 65,970
Aerospace product and parts manufacturing 63,010
Support activities for air transportation 59,940
Federal government 56,270

Mechanics and technicians usually work full time on rotating 8-hour shifts. Overtime and weekend work often are required.

Union Membership for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Compared with workers in all occupations, aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians have a higher percentage of workers who belong to a union.

Job Outlook for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Overall employment of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians is projected to grow 5 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth will vary by occupation (see table below).

Air traffic is expected to increase gradually over the coming decade, and will require additional aircraft maintenance, including that performed on new aircraft. Some airlines may outsource maintenance work to specialized maintenance and repair shops both domestically and abroad. This practice is expected to reduce employment growth opportunities in the air transportation industry over the next 10 years.

Job Prospects for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Job opportunities are expected to be good because there will be a need to replace those workers leaving the occupation.

Employment projections data for Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians, 2016-26
Occupational Title Employment, 2016 Projected Employment, 2026 Change, 2016-26
Percent Numeric
Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians 149,500 157,000 5 7,500
  Avionics technicians 17,500 18,600 6 1,100
  Aircraft mechanics and service technicians 132,000 138,400 5 6,400


*Some content used by permission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

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