Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Career, Salary and Education Information

What They Do: Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians inspect, maintain, and repair vehicles and machinery used in construction, farming, and other industries.

Work Environment: Service technicians usually work indoors in noisy repair shops. They often lift heavy parts and tools, handle greasy and dirty equipment, and stand or lie in uncomfortable positions. Most service technicians work full time, and many work evenings and weekends.

How to Become One: Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians have a high school diploma or equivalent. Because vehicle and equipment technology is increasingly sophisticated and computerized, some employers prefer to hire service technicians who have completed a training program at a postsecondary institution.

Salary: The median annual wage for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is $53,770.

Job Outlook: Overall employment of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is projected to grow 8 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations.

Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians with similar occupations.

Following is everything you need to know about a career as a heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technician with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career:

Top 3 Heavy Vehicle Mechanic Jobs

  • LCV NORTHCOM NTC: Tactical Vehicle Mechanic (Contingency Hire) - KBR, Inc. - Fort Irwin, CA

    Tactical Vehicle Mechanic (Contingency Hire) The Tactical Vehicle Mechanic performs FMC + Safety ... heavy equipment transport trucks and trailers • Performs diagnostic tests, using measuring ...

  • Heavy Duty Truck Mechanic - Phoenix Block - Montgomery, AL

    We are looking for a Heavy Duty Truck Mechanic to join our team! You will be responsible for repairing various vehicles and trailer systems. Responsibilities: * Repair trucks, and other motor ...

  • Heavy Truck Mechanic - Matt Brown Trucking - Scottsdale, AZ

    Heavy Truck Mechanic We are looking to add another skilled mechanic to maintain and repair our ... Inspect vehicle engine and mechanical /electrical components to diagnose issues accurately * Conduct ...

See all Heavy Vehicle Mechanic jobs

Top 3 Mobile Equipment Mechanic Jobs

  • Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic - USAJOBS - Palmdale, CA

    The primary purpose of this position HEAVY MOBILE EQUIPMENT MECHANIC , WG-5803-10 is to troubleshoot, overhaul, repair, modify, and maintain a variety of types of heavy mobile and automotive equipment

  • Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic - USAJOBS - Corpus Christi, TX

    Promotion potential 10 * Job family (Series) 5803 Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic * Supervisory status No * Security clearance Secret * Drug test No * Announcement number DE-11719573-23-CLS * Control ...

  • Mobile Equipment Mechanic - Altec Inc. - Moorpark, CA

    A normal day for an Altec Mobile Service Technician / Equipment Field Mechanic could include o n-site troubleshooting, diagnostics, major component change outs, and preventive maintenance of truck ...

See all Mobile Equipment Mechanic jobs

What Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians Do[About this section] [To Top]

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians, also called mechanics, inspect, maintain, and repair vehicles and machinery used in construction, farming, rail transportation, and other industries.

Duties of Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians typically do the following:

  • Consult equipment operating manuals, blueprints, and drawings
  • Perform scheduled maintenance, such as cleaning and lubricating parts
  • Diagnose and identify malfunctions, using computerized tools and equipment
  • Inspect, repair, and replace defective or worn parts, such as bearings, pistons, and gears
  • Overhaul and test major components, such as engines, hydraulic systems, and electrical systems
  • Disassemble and reassemble heavy equipment and components
  • Travel to worksites to repair large equipment, such as cranes
  • Maintain logs of equipment condition and work performed

Heavy vehicles and mobile equipment are critical to many industrial activities, including construction and railroad transportation. Various types of equipment, such as tractors, cranes, and bulldozers, are used to haul materials, till land, lift beams, and dig earth to pave the way for development and construction.

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians repair and maintain engines, hydraulic systems, transmissions, and electrical systems of agricultural, industrial, construction, and rail equipment. They ensure the performance and safety of fuel lines, brakes, and other systems.

These service technicians use diagnostic computers and equipment to identify problems and make adjustments or repairs. For example, they may use an oscilloscope to observe the signals produced by electronic components. Service technicians also use many different power and machine tools, including pneumatic wrenches, lathes, and welding equipment. A pneumatic tool, such as an impact wrench, is a tool powered by compressed air.

Service technicians also use many different hand tools, such as screwdrivers, pliers, and wrenches, to work on small parts and in hard-to-reach areas. They generally purchase these tools over the course of their careers, often investing thousands of dollars in their inventory.

After identifying malfunctioning equipment, service technicians repair, replace, and recalibrate components such as hydraulic pumps and spark plugs. Doing this may involve disassembling and reassembling major equipment or making adjustments through an onboard computer program.

The following are examples of types of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians:

Farm equipment mechanics and service technicians service and repair farm equipment, such as tractors and harvesters. They also work on smaller consumer-grade lawn and garden tractors. Most work for dealer repair shops, where farmers increasingly send their equipment for maintenance.

Mobile heavy equipment mechanics repair and maintain construction and surface mining equipment, such as bulldozers, cranes, graders, and excavators. Most work for governments, equipment rental and leasing shops, and large construction and mining companies.

Rail car repairers specialize in servicing railroad locomotives, subway cars, and other rolling stock. They usually work for railroads, public and private transit companies, and railcar manufacturers.

Mechanics who work primarily on automobiles are described in the profile on automotive service technicians and mechanics.

Mechanics who work primarily on large trucks and buses are described in the profile on diesel service technicians and mechanics.

Mechanics who work primarily on motorboats, motorcycles, and small all-terrain vehicles are described in the profile on small engine mechanics.

Work Environment for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians hold about 223,000 jobs. Employment in the detailed occupations that make up heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is distributed as follows:

Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines 152,600
Farm equipment mechanics and service technicians 49,500
Rail car repairers 20,900

The largest employers of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians are as follows:

Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers 11%
Government 9%
Heavy and civil engineering construction 8%
Rental and leasing services 8%

Although many service technicians work indoors in repair shops, some service technicians travel to worksites to make repairs because it is often too expensive to transport heavy or mobile equipment to a shop. Generally, more experienced service technicians specialize in field service. These workers drive trucks that are specially equipped with replacement parts and tools, and they spend considerable time outdoors and often drive long distances.

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians frequently lift heavy parts and tools, handle greasy and dirty equipment, and stand or lie in awkward positions.

Injuries and Illnesses for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Farm equipment mechanics and service technicians have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations. Farm equipment mechanics and service techs frequently work with heavy parts and tools. Common workplace injuries include small cuts, sprains, and bruises.

Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technician Work Schedules

Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians work full time, and many work evenings or weekends. Overtime is common.

Farm equipment mechanics' work varies by time of the year. During busy planting and harvesting seasons, for example, mechanics often work six or seven 12-hour days per week. In the winter months, however, they may work less than full time.

How to Become a Heavy Vehicle or Mobile Equipment Service Technician[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians near you!

Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians have a high school diploma or equivalent. Because vehicle and equipment technology is increasingly sophisticated and computerized, some employers prefer to hire service technicians who have completed a formal training program at a postsecondary institution.

Education for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians have a high school diploma or equivalent. High school courses in automotive repair, electronics, physics, and welding provide a strong foundation for a service technician's career. However, high school graduates often need further training to become fully qualified.

Completing a vocational or other postsecondary training program in diesel technology or heavy equipment mechanics is increasingly considered the best preparation for some entry-level positions. Offered by vocational schools and community colleges, these programs cover the basics of diagnostic techniques, electronics, and other related subjects. Each program may last 1 to 2 years and lead to a certificate of completion. Other programs, which lead to associate's degrees, generally take 2 years to complete.

Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technician Training

Entry-level workers with no formal background in heavy vehicle repair often receive a few months of on-the-job training before they begin performing routine service tasks and making minor repairs. Trainees advance to more complex work as they show competence, and they usually become fully qualified after 3 to 4 years of work.

Service technicians who have completed a postsecondary training program in diesel technology or heavy equipment mechanics typically require less on-the-job training.

Many employers send new service technicians to training sessions conducted by equipment manufacturers. Training sessions may focus on particular components and technologies or particular types of equipment.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Some manufacturers offer certification in specific repair methods or equipment. Although not required, certification can demonstrate a service technician's competence and usually commands higher pay.

Important Qualities for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

Dexterity. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians must perform many tasks, such as disassembling engine parts, connecting or attaching components, and using hand tools, with a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination.

Mechanical skills. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians must be familiar with engine components and systems and know how they interact with each other. They must often disassemble major parts for repairs and be able to reassemble them.

Organizational skills. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians must maintain accurate service records and parts inventories.

Physical strength. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians must be able to lift and move heavy equipment, tools, and parts without risking injury.

Troubleshooting skills. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians must be familiar with diagnostic equipment to find the source of malfunctions.

Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technician Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is $53,770. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $36,900, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $78,280.

Median annual wages for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians are as follows:

Rail car repairers $60,250
Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines $58,030
Farm equipment mechanics and service technicians $46,910

The median annual wages for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Government $60,550
Heavy and civil engineering construction $53,600
Rental and leasing services $48,620
Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers $46,970

Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians work full time, and many work evenings or weekends. Overtime is common.

Farm equipment mechanics' work varies by time of the year. During busy planting and harvesting seasons, for example, mechanics often work six or seven 12-hour days per week. In the winter months, however, they may work less than full time.

Job Outlook for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians[About this section] [To Top]

Overall employment of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is projected to grow 8 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations.

About 23,900 openings for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment of Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians

As the stock of heavy vehicles and mobile equipment continues to increase, more service technicians will be needed to maintain it. Projected employment growth varies by specialty.

Agricultural production requires the use of increasingly complex and sophisticated software-driven farm equipment, which will create demand for farm equipment mechanics and service technicians to maintain the equipment and to train customers in its use.

Population and business growth will result in the construction of houses, office buildings, bridges, and other structures, which in turn will require mobile heavy equipment mechanics in the construction industry.

Some rail car repairers should continue to be needed to service trains used for freight shipping and transportation, as well as for public transportation.

Employment projections data for Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians, 2021-31
Occupational Title Employment, 2021 Projected Employment, 2031 Change, 2021-31
Percent Numeric
Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics 223,000 240,600 8 17,700
  Farm equipment mechanics and service technicians 49,500 54,800 11 5,300
  Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines 152,600 164,200 8 11,600
  Rail car repairers 20,900 21,600 4 800


A portion of the information on this page is used by permission of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Explore more careers: View all Careers or the Top 30 Career Profiles


Search for jobs: