Communications Schools, Online Degrees and Programs

Communications professionals play an important role in the information economy. News media, business marketing, and entertainment are just a few of the industries that offer career opportunities for communications graduates.
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At Arkansas State, we produce more than graduates-we combine the theory with the practice to create innovators and leaders of tomorrow.

 

With 11 colleges representing all major academic disciplines, a student population of more than 14,000 and 700 faculty, Arkansas State is a global center of learning for some of the most important emerging technologies and new sciences shaping the future of our world.

Programs:
  • Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies
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Learning at Full Sail University has always centered around interaction and the exchange of ideas. Our online curriculum fully embraces this philosophy. We have developed our own online learning environment with the aim of being the most people-focused education experience on the web.
Programs:
  • Public Relations, Master of Arts (Online)
  • Media Communications, Bachelor of Science (Online)
  • New Media Journalism, Master of Science

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Your creativity is a big part of who you are and where you're going. To take it, and your future, as far as you want, you need an education that's focused on developing your talents and putting you on the path toward the creative career that stirs your imagination.

Locations:  Atlanta, GA San Antonio, TX Austin, TX More...

Programs:
  • Digital Image Management (D)

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Communications Degrees and Programs: What You Need to Know

College communications degrees prepare you for careers in writing, visual communications, speech communication, or journalism. Depending on the major you choose, you may focus on digital or print media; theory or applied business communications.
  • Associate of Arts, Applied Science, or Business Administration. The two-year associate's degree offers a career-oriented curriculum in communications. Depending on the associate's degree type you choose (AA, AAS, or ABA), you may focus on writing and graphic communications, communications technology, or organizational communications.
  • Bachelor of Arts in Communications. The four-year undergraduate degree features core liberal arts and science classes as well as a comprehensive foundation in written and verbal communications. The BA curriculum combines communications theory and practice, with training in digital communications or business.
  • Master of Arts (MA) or Master of Business Administration. These graduate degrees may be completed in two years. They feature advanced training in a specialized communications field.
Look for communications schools at art institutes, technical and vocational schools, and colleges. More and more programs are also offering communications online degree options to accommodate working adults.

Communications Career Outlook

Communications career prospects vary depending on the specialty you choose. The Department of Labor forecasts strong employment growth in digital communication and communications technology. Advertising and public relations are perennial sources of employment for communication degree holders. Salaries vary based on the career direction you choose. Writers earned $64,560 in 2008, and entry-level PR specialists averaged $58,960. A communications degree prepares you to communicate information using today's wide range of media: print, digital, speech, and visual art. Whether you apply your expertise to entertain, inform, or sell a product, you'll enter the workforce with a powerful and versatile skill set.

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