Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Career, Salary and Education Information

What They Do: Administrative services and facilities managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help an organization run efficiently.

Work Environment: Most administrative services and facilities managers work full time, and some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become One: Although administrative services and facilities managers' educational requirements vary by organization and the work they do, these workers typically need a bachelor's degree and related work experience.

Salary: The median annual wage for administrative services and facilities managers is $99,290.

Job Outlook: Employment of administrative services and facilities managers is projected to grow 7 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of administrative services and facilities managers with similar occupations.

Following is everything you need to know about a career as an administrative services manager with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career:

Top 3 Administrative Manager Jobs

  • Administrative Manager / Customer Service Associate - AUTO 360 Garage - Daly City, CA

    AUTO 360 Garage is currently hiring for a full-time Administrative Manager / Customer Service Associate to help our customers and provide administrative assistance around the office in the Daly City ...

  • Branch Administrative Manager - Pacific Office Automation - Fife, WA

    Position We are seeking a Branch Administrative Manager at our office in Fife, WA . The ideal candidate is someone who can multi-task and be detail-oriented while maintaining a high level of ...

  • Administrative Management Specialist - USAJOBS - Las Vegas, NV

    Videos Help Duties As an Administrative Management Specialist, you will perform the following duties: * Leads the management processes and procedures, developing and implementing office initiatives ...

See all Administrative Manager jobs

What Administrative Services and Facilities Managers Do[About this section] [To Top]

Administrative services and facilities managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help an organization run efficiently. The specific responsibilities vary, but these managers typically maintain facilities and supervise activities that include recordkeeping, mail distribution, and office upkeep. In a small organization, they may direct all support services and may be called the business office manager. Large organizations may have several layers of administrative managers who specialize in different areas.

Duties of Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Administrative services and facilities managers typically do the following:

  • Supervise clerical and administrative staff
  • Set goals and deadlines for their department
  • Develop, manage, and monitor records
  • Recommend changes to policies or procedures in order to improve operations, such as reassessing supplies or recordkeeping
  • Monitor facilities to make sure that they remain safe, secure, and well maintained
  • Oversee the maintenance and repair of machinery, equipment, and electrical and mechanical systems
  • Make sure that facilities meet environmental, health, and security standards and comply with regulations

Administrative services and facilities managers plan, coordinate, and direct a broad range of activities that allow organizations to run efficiently. An organization may have several managers who oversee services for multiple departments, such as mail, printing and copying, recordkeeping, security, building maintenance, and recycling.

Specific tasks and responsibilities may vary. For example, an administrative services manager might be responsible for making sure that the organization has the supplies and services it needs. A manager who coordinates space allocation might consider employee morale and available funds when determining how to arrange a physical space.

Administrative services and facilities managers may examine energy consumption patterns, technology use, and office equipment. They also may plan for maintenance and replacement of equipment, such as computers.

The following are examples of types of administrative services managers:

Facilities managers oversee buildings, grounds, equipment, and supplies. Their responsibilities cover several categories, including operations, maintenance, and planning and managing projects.

Facilities managers may oversee renovation projects to improve efficiency or to meet regulations and environmental, health, and security standards. For example, they may recommend energy-saving alternatives or efficiencies that reduce waste. In addition, they continually monitor facilities to ensure that the premises are safe, secure, and well maintained. Facilities managers also direct staff, including grounds maintenance workers, janitors and building cleaners, and general maintenance and repair workers.

Records and information managers develop, monitor, and manage an organization's records. They provide information to chief executives and ensure that employees follow records and information management guidelines. They may direct the operations of onsite or offsite records facilities. These managers also work closely with an organization’s attorneys and its technology and business operations staff. Records and information managers do not handle medical records, which are administered by medical and health services managers.

Work Environment for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers[About this section] [To Top]

Administrative services managers hold about 239,000 jobs. The largest employers of administrative services managers are as follows:

Educational services; state, local, and private 14%
Professional, scientific, and technical services 12%
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 9%
Finance and insurance 9%
Management of companies and enterprises 6%

Facilities managers hold about 109,100 jobs. The largest employers of facilities managers are as follows:

Educational services; state, local, and private 15%
Healthcare and social assistance 11%
Manufacturing 10%
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 8%
Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services 6%

Administrative services and facilities managers spend much of their day in an office. They may observe workers throughout the building, go outdoors to supervise groundskeeping activities, or visit other facilities they direct.

Administrative Services and Facilities Manager Work Schedules

Most administrative services and facilities managers work full time, and some work more than 40 hours per week. Facilities managers often are on call to address problems that arise at all hours.

How to Become an Administrative Services or Facilities Manager[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Administrative Services or Facilities Managers near you!

Educational requirements for administrative services and facilities managers vary by organization and the work they do. But these workers typically need a bachelor's degree and related work experience.

Education for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Administrative services and facilities managers typically need a bachelor's degree, often in business or a related field. However, some people enter the occupation with a high school diploma.

Work Experience for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Administrative services and facilities managers must have related work experience that reflects managerial and leadership abilities. Facilities managers should have experience in business operations, project management, and building maintenance, such as from having worked as a general maintenance and repair worker or a cost estimator. Records and information managers should have administrative or business operations experience involving recordkeeping. Records and information managers in the legal field often must have experience as a paralegal or legal assistant.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Although it is not required, professional certification may give candidates an advantage when applying for jobs.

Several professional associations for administrative services and facilities managers offer certifications. Some associations, including the International Facility Management Association> (IFMA), offer certification that specializes in facility management. Others offering certification include the Institute of Certified Records Managers (ICRM), for records and information managers, and the ARMA International for those specializing in information governance.

Important Qualities for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Analytical skills. Administrative services and facilities managers must be able to review an organization's procedures for ways to improve efficiency.

Communication skills. Administrative services and facilities managers often work with others. They must be able to convey ideas clearly, both orally and in writing.

Detail oriented. Administrative services and facilities managers must pay attention to details across a range of tasks, such as ensuring that the organization complies with building codes and managing the process of buying equipment.

Leadership skills. In directing workers and coordinating organizational duties, administrative services and facilities managers must be able to motivate employees and handle problems that arise.

Administrative Services and Facilities Manager Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for administrative services and facilities managers is $99,290. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $59,210, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $167,450.

The median annual wages for administrative services and facilities managers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Finance and insurance $120,620
Professional, scientific, and technical services $119,750
Local government, excluding education and hospitals $99,330
Educational services; state, local, and private $94,410
Healthcare and social assistance $88,090

Most administrative services and facilities managers work full time, and some work more than 40 hours per week. Facilities managers often are on call to address problems that arise at all hours.

Job Outlook for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers[About this section] [To Top]

Employment of administrative services managers is projected to grow 7 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 31,900 openings for administrative services and facilities managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

See all administrative jobs.

Employment of Administrative Services and Facilities Managers

Administrative tasks, including facilities management and records and information management, will remain important in a range of industries.

A continuing focus on the environmental impact and energy efficiency of buildings will keep facilities managers in demand. Improving energy efficiency can reduce costs and often is required by regulation. For example, building codes typically ensure that buildings meet environmental standards. Facilities managers will be needed to oversee these improvements in a wide range of areas, from heating and air-conditioning systems to roofing. In addition, facilities managers will be needed to plan for natural disasters, ensuring that any damage to a building will be minimal and that the organization can get back to work quickly.

"Smart building" technology is expected to affect the work of facilities managers over the next decade. This technology will provide facilities managers with timely and detailed information, such as equipment failure alerts and reminders to do maintenance. This information should allow facilities managers to complete their work more efficiently.

Employment of records and information managers also is expected to grow. Demand is expected to be particularly strong for those working in “information governance,” which includes the privacy and legal aspects of records management. As cloud computing and mobile devices become more prevalent, records and information managers will have a critical role in helping organizations develop new records and information management practices and in maintaining data security.

Employment projections data for Administrative Services and Facilities Managers, 2021-31
Occupational Title Employment, 2021 Projected Employment, 2031 Change, 2021-31
Percent Numeric
Administrative services and facilities managers 348,100 371,700 7 23,600
  Administrative services and facilities managers 239,000 255,100 7 16,100
  Administrative services and facilities managers 109,100 116,600 7 7,600


A portion of the information on this page is used by permission of the U.S. Department of Labor.


Explore more careers: View all Careers or the Top 30 Career Profiles


Search for jobs: