Preschool Teachers

Career, Salary and Education Information

Following is everything you need to know about a career as a preschool teacher with lots of details. As a first step, take a look at some of the following jobs, which are real jobs with real employers. You will be able to see the very real job career requirements for employers who are actively hiring. The link will open in a new tab so that you can come back to this page to continue reading about the career:

Top 3 Preschool Teacher Jobs

See all Preschool Teacher jobs

What Preschool Teachers Do[About this section] [To Top]

Preschool teachers educate and care for children younger than age 5 who have not yet entered kindergarten. They teach language, motor, and social skills to young children.

Duties of Preschool Teachers

Preschool teachers typically do the following:

  • Teach children basic skills such as color, shape, number, and letter recognition
  • Work with children in groups or one on one, depending on the needs of children and the subject matter
  • Plan and carry out a curriculum that targets different areas of child development
  • Organize activities so children can learn about the world, explore interests, and develop skills
  • Develop schedules and routines to ensure children have enough physical activity, rest, and playtime
  • Watch for signs of emotional or developmental problems in children and bring them to the attention of the parents
  • Keep records of the students' progress, routines, and interests, and inform parents about their child's development

Young children learn from playing, problem solving, questioning, and experimenting. Preschool teachers use play and other instructional techniques to teach children about the world. For example, they use storytelling and rhyming games to teach language and vocabulary. They may help improve children's social skills by having them work together to build a neighborhood in a sandbox or teach math by having children count when building with blocks.

Preschool teachers work with children from different ethnic, racial, and religious backgrounds. Teachers include topics in their lessons that teach children how to respect people of different backgrounds and cultures.

Work Environment for Preschool Teachers[About this section] [To Top]

Preschool teachers hold about 478,500 jobs. The largest employers of preschool teachers are as follows:

Child day care services 57%
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 18
Elementary and secondary schools; state, local, and private 17
Individual and family services 3

Seeing children develop new skills and gain an appreciation of knowledge and learning can be very rewarding. However, it can also be tiring to work with young, active children all day.

Preschool Teacher Work Schedules

Preschool teachers in public schools generally work during school hours. Many work the traditional 10-month school year and have a 2-month break during the summer. Some preschool teachers may teach in summer programs.

Teachers in districts with a year-round schedule typically work 9 weeks in a row then have a break for 3 weeks before starting a new school session.

Those working in daycare settings may work longer hours and often work year-round.

How to Become a Preschool Teacher[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Preschool Teachers near you!

Education and training requirements vary based on settings and state regulations. They typically need at least an associate's degree.

Education for Preschool Teachers

Preschool teachers typically need at least an associate's degree.

Preschool teachers in Head Start programs are required to have at least an associate's degree. However, at least 50 percent of all preschool teachers in Head Start programs nationwide must have a bachelor's degree in early childhood education or a related field. Those with a degree in a related field must have experience teaching preschool-age children.

In public schools, preschool teachers are generally required to have at least a bachelor's degree in early childhood education or a related field. Bachelor's degree programs teach students about children's development, provide strategies to teach young children, and explain how to observe and document children's progress.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Preschool Teachers

Some states require preschool teachers to obtain the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential offered by the Council for Professional Recognition. Obtaining the CDA credential requires coursework, experience in the field, a written exam, and observation of the candidate working with children. The CDA credential must be renewed every 3 years.

In public schools, preschool teachers must be licensed to teach early childhood education, which covers preschool through third grade. Requirements vary by state, but they generally require a bachelor's degree and passing an exam to demonstrate competency. Most states require teachers to complete continuing education credits in order to maintain their license.

Other Experience for Preschool Teachers

A few states require preschool teachers to have some work experience in a childcare setting. The amount of experience necessary varies by state. In these cases, preschool teachers often start out as childcare workers or teacher assistants.

Important Qualities for Preschool Teachers

Communication skills. Preschool teachers need good communication skills to talk to parents and colleagues about students' progress. They need good writing and speaking skills to convey this information effectively. They must also be able to communicate well with small children.

Creativity. Preschool teachers must plan lessons that engage young students. In addition, they need to adapt their lessons to suit different learning styles.

Interpersonal skills. Preschool teachers must understand children's emotional needs and be able to develop good relationships with parents, children, and coworkers.

Organizational skills. Teachers need to be organized to plan lessons and keep records of their students.

Patience. Working with children can be stressful, and preschool teachers should be able to respond calmly to overwhelming and difficult situations.

Physical stamina. Working with children can be physically demanding, so preschool teachers should have a lot of energy.

Advancement for Preschool Teachers

Experienced preschool teachers can advance to become the director of a preschool or childcare center or a lead teacher, who may be responsible for the instruction of several classes. Those with a bachelor's degree in early childhood education frequently are qualified to teach kindergarten through grade 3, in addition to preschool. Teaching positions at these higher grades typically pay more. For more information, see the profiles on preschool and childcare center directors and kindergarten and elementary school teachers.

Preschool Teacher Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for preschool teachers is $28,790. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,430, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $54,310.

The median annual wages for preschool teachers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; state, local, and private $45,230
Individual and family services 31,060
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 29,950
Child day care services 26,520

Preschool teachers in public schools generally work during school hours. Many work the traditional 10-month school year and a 2-month break during the summer. Some preschool teachers may teach in summer programs.

Teachers in districts with a year-round schedule typically work 8 weeks in a row then have a break for 1 week before starting a new school session. They also have a 5-week midwinter break.

Those working in daycare settings may work longer hours and often work year-round.

Job Outlook for Preschool Teachers[About this section] [To Top]

Employment of preschool teachers is projected to grow 10 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations.

Early childhood education is important for a child's short- and long-term intellectual and social development. More preschool teachers should be needed as a result of the increasing demand for early childhood education.

In addition, the number of preschool-aged children is expected to increase; however, their share of the overall population should remain constant.

Job Prospects for Preschool Teachers

Workers with previous experience working with preschool-aged children may have better opportunities finding a job.

Employment projections data for Preschool Teachers, 2016-26
Occupational Title Employment, 2016 Projected Employment, 2026 Change, 2016-26
Percent Numeric
Preschool teachers, except special education 478,500 528,600 10 50,100


*Some content used by permission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

Explore more careers: View all Careers or Browse Careers by Category

Search for jobs: