Line Installers and Repairers

Career, Salary and Education Information

What They Do: Line installers and repairers install or repair electrical power systems and telecommunications cables, including fiber optics.

Work Environment: Line workers encounter serious hazards on the job, including working with high-voltage electricity, often at great heights. The work also can be physically demanding. Although most work full time during regular business hours, some work irregular hours on evenings, nights, weekends, and holidays when needed.

How to Become One: To become proficient, most line installers and repairers require technical instruction and long-term on-the-job training. Apprenticeships are common.

Salary: The median annual wage for electrical power-line installers and repairers is $70,910. The median annual wage for telecommunications line installers and repairers is $58,280.

Job Outlook: Overall employment of line installers and repairers is projected to grow 4 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be best for those with good technical and mechanical skills.

Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of line installers and repairers with similar occupations.

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What Line Installers and Repairers Do[About this section] [To Top]

Line installers and repairers, also known as line workers, install or repair electrical power systems and telecommunications cables, including fiber optics.

Duties of Line Installers and Repairers

Electrical power-line installers and repairers typically do the following:

  • Install, maintain, or repair the power lines that move electricity
  • Identify defective devices, voltage regulators, transformers, and switches
  • Inspect and test power lines and auxiliary equipment
  • String power lines between poles, towers, and buildings
  • Climb poles and transmission towers and use truck-mounted buckets to get to equipment
  • Operate power equipment when installing and repairing poles, towers, and lines
  • Drive work vehicles to job sites
  • Follow safety standards and procedures

Telecommunications line installers and repairers typically do the following:

  • Install, maintain, or repair telecommunications equipment
  • Inspect or test lines or cables
  • Lay underground cable, including fiber optic lines, directly in trenches
  • Pull cables in underground conduit
  • Install aerial cables, including over lakes or across rivers
  • Operate power equipment when installing and repairing poles, towers, and lines
  • Drive work vehicles to job sites
  • Set up service for customers

A complex network of physical power lines and cables provides consumers with electricity, landline telephone communication, cable television, and Internet access. Line installers and repairers, also known as line workers, are responsible for installing and maintaining these networks.

Line installers and repairers can specialize in different areas depending on the type of network and industry in which they work:

Electrical power-line installers and repairers install and maintain the power grid—the network of power lines that moves electricity from generating plants to customers. They routinely work with high-voltage electricity, which requires extreme caution. The electrical current can range from hundreds of thousands of volts for long-distance transmission lines that make up the power grid to less than 10,000 volts for distribution lines that supply electricity to homes and businesses.

Line workers who maintain the interstate power grid work in crews that travel to locations throughout a large region to service transmission lines and towers. Workers employed by local utilities work mainly with lower voltage distribution lines, maintaining equipment such as transformers, voltage regulators, and switches. They also may work on traffic lights and street lights.

Telecommunications line installers and repairers install and maintain the lines and cables used by network communications companies. Depending on the service provided—local and long-distance telephone, cable television, or Internet—telecommunications companies use different types of cables, including fiber optic cables. Unlike metallic cables that carry electricity, fiber optic cables are made of glass and transmit signals using light. Working with fiber optics requires special skills, such as the ability to splice and terminate optical cables. In addition, workers use specialized equipment to test and troubleshoot cables and networking equipment.

Because these systems are complicated, many line workers also specialize by duty:

Line installers install new cable. They may work for construction contractors, utilities, or telecommunications companies. Workers generally start a new job by digging underground trenches or erecting utility poles and towers to carry the wires and cables. They use a variety of construction equipment, including digger derricks, which are trucks equipped with augers and cranes used to dig holes and set poles in place. Line installers also use trenchers, cable plows, and directional bore machines, which are used to cut openings in the earth to lay underground cables. Once the poles, towers, tunnels, or trenches are ready, workers install the new cable.

Line repairers are employed by utilities and telecommunications companies that maintain existing power and telecommunications lines. Maintenance needs may be identified in a variety of ways, including remote monitoring, aerial inspections, and by customer reports of service outages. Line repairers often must replace aging or outdated equipment, so many of these workers have installation duties in addition to their repair duties.

When a problem is reported, line repairers must identify the cause and fix it. This usually involves diagnostic testing using specialized equipment and repair work. To work on poles, line installers usually use bucket trucks to raise themselves to the top of the structure, although all line workers must be adept at climbing poles and towers when necessary. Workers use special safety equipment to keep them from falling when climbing utility poles and towers.

Storms and other natural disasters can cause extensive damage to power lines. When power is lost, line repairers must work quickly to restore service to customers.

Work Environment for Line Installers and Repairers[About this section] [To Top]

Electrical power-line installers and repairers hold about 119,400 jobs. The largest employers of electrical power-line installers and repairers are as follows:

Electric power generation, transmission and distribution 46%
Power and communication line and related structures construction 27%
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 12%
Electrical contractors and other wiring installation contractors 5%

Telecommunications line installers and repairers hold about 122,700 jobs. The largest employers of telecommunications line installers and repairers are as follows:

Telecommunications 55%
Building equipment contractors 16%
Utility system construction 15%
Self-employed workers 3%

The work of line installers and repairers can be physically demanding. Line installers must be comfortable working at great heights and in confined spaces. Despite the help of bucket trucks, all line workers must be able to climb utility poles and transmission towers and balance while working on them.

Their work often requires that they drive utility vehicles, travel long distances, and work outdoors.

Line installers and repairers often must work under challenging weather conditions, such as in snow, wind, rain, and extreme heat and cold, in order to keep electricity and telecommunications flowing.

Injuries and Illnesses for Line Installers and Repairers

Line workers encounter serious hazards on their jobs and must follow safety procedures to minimize danger. For example, workers must wear safety equipment when entering underground manholes and test for the presence of gas before going underground.

Electrical power-line installers and repairers can be electrocuted if they come in contact with a live cable on a high-voltage power line. When workers engage live wires, they use electrically insulated protective devices and tools to minimize their risk.

To prevent injuries, line installers and repairers use fall-protection equipment when working on poles or towers. Safety procedures and training have significantly reduced the danger for line workers. However, telecommunications line installers and repairers still have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations.

Line Installer and Repairer Work Schedules

Although most work full time during regular business hours, some line installers and repairers must work evenings and weekends. In emergencies or after storms and other natural disasters, workers may have to work long hours for several days in a row.

How to Become a Line Installer or Repairer[About this section] [To Top]

Get the education you need: Find schools for Line Installers and Repairers near you!

A high school diploma or equivalent is typically required for entry-level positions, but most line installers and repairers need technical instruction and long-term on-the-job training to become proficient. Apprenticeships are also common.

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Education for Line Installers and Repairers

Most companies require line installers and repairers to have a high school diploma or equivalent. Employers prefer candidates with basic knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. In addition, technical knowledge of electricity or electronics obtained through military service, vocational programs, or community colleges can also be helpful.

Many community colleges offer programs in telecommunications, electronics, or electricity. Some programs work with local companies to offer 1-year certificates that emphasize hands-on fieldwork.

More advanced 2-year associate's degree programs provide students with a broad knowledge of the technology used in telecommunications and electrical utilities. These programs offer courses in electricity, electronics, fiber optics, and microwave transmission.

Line Installer and Repairer Training

Electrical line installers and repairers often must complete apprenticeships or other employer training programs. These programs, which can last up to 3 years, combine on-the-job training with technical instruction and are sometimes administered jointly by the employer and the union representing the workers. For example, the Electrical Training Alliance offers apprenticeship programs in four specialty areas. The basic qualifications to enter an apprenticeship program are as follows:

  • Minimum age of 18
  • High school education or equivalent
  • One year of algebra
  • Qualifying score on an aptitude test
  • Pass substance abuse screening

Line installers and repairers who work for telecommunications companies typically receive several years of on-the-job training. They also may be encouraged to attend training from equipment manufacturers, schools, unions, or industry training organizations.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations for Line Installers and Repairers

Although not mandatory, certification for line installers and repairers is also available from several associations. For example, the Electrical Training ALLIANCE offers certification for line installers and repairers in several specialty areas.

In addition, The Fiber Optic Association (FOA) offers two levels of fiber optic certification for telecommunications line installers and repairers.

Workers who drive heavy company vehicles usually need a commercial driver's license.

Advancement for Line Installers and Repairers

Entry-level line workers generally begin with an apprenticeship, which includes both classroom training and hands-on work experience. As they learn additional skills from more experienced workers, they may advance to more complex tasks. In time, experienced line workers advance to more sophisticated maintenance and repair positions in which they are responsible for increasingly large portions of the network.

After 3 to 4 years of working, qualified line workers reach the journey level. A journey-level line worker is no longer considered an apprentice and can perform most tasks without supervision. Journey-level line workers also may qualify for positions at other companies. Workers with many years of experience may become first-line supervisors or trainers.

Important Qualities for Line Installers and Repairers

Color vision. Workers who handle electrical wires and cables must distinguish colors because the wires and cables are often color coded.

Mechanical skills. Line installers and repairers must have the knowledge and skills to repair or replace complex electrical and telecommunications lines and equipment.

Physical stamina. Line installers and repairers often must climb poles and work at great heights with heavy tools and equipment. Therefore, installers and repairers need to work for long periods without tiring easily.

Physical strength. Line installers and repairers must be strong enough to lift heavy tools, cables, and equipment on a regular basis.

Teamwork. Because workers often rely on their fellow crew members for their safety, teamwork is critical.

Technical skills. Line installers use sophisticated diagnostic equipment on circuit breakers, switches, and transformers. They must be familiar with electrical systems and the appropriate tools needed to fix and maintain them.

Troubleshooting skills. Line installers and repairers must diagnose problems in increasingly complex electrical systems and telecommunication lines.

Line Installer and Repairer Salaries[About this section] [More salary/earnings info] [To Top]

The median annual wage for electrical power-line installers and repairers is $70,910. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,200, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $101,560.

The median annual wage for telecommunications line installers and repairers is $58,280. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $30,950, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $92,440.

The median annual wages for electrical power-line installers and repairers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Electric power generation, transmission and distribution $76,460
Local government, excluding education and hospitals $64,010
Power and communication line and related structures construction $60,810
Electrical contractors and other wiring installation contractors $60,730

The median annual wages for telecommunications line installers and repairers in the top industries in which they work are as follows:

Telecommunications $70,040
Building equipment contractors $41,650
Utility system construction $41,590

Although most work full time during regular business hours, some line installers and repairers may work evenings and weekends. In emergencies or after storms and other natural disasters, they may have to work long hours for several days in a row.

Union Membership for Line Installers and Repairers

Compared with workers in all occupations, line installers and repairers have a higher percentage of workers who belong to a union.

Job Outlook for Line Installers and Repairers[About this section] [To Top]

Overall employment of line installers and repairers is projected to grow 4 percent over the next ten years, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth will vary by specialty.

Employment of telecommunications line installers and repairers is projected to show little or no change over the next ten years. As the population grows and customers increasingly demand enhanced connectivity, installers will continue to build out and provide newer and faster telephone, cable, and Internet services. However, growth may be limited because many households already have access to high speed Internet.

New technological developments in wireless broadband service and the future development of the 5G mobile broadband network may eventually replace the need for hard-wired telecommunication lines. However, the existing telecommunication infrastructure will require upgrades to handle the 5G network, which should increase demand for some line installers.

Employment of electrical power-line installers and repairers is projected to grow 14 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be largely due to the growing population and expansion of cities. With each new housing development or office park, new electric power lines are installed and will require maintenance. In addition, the interstate power grid will continue to grow in complexity to ensure reliability.

Job Prospects for Line Installers and Repairers

Good job opportunities are expected for line installers and repairers overall. Highly skilled workers with apprenticeship training or a 2-year associate's degree in telecommunications, electronics, or electricity should have the best job opportunities.

Employment projections data for Line Installers and Repairers, 2018-28
Occupational Title Employment, 2018 Projected Employment, 2028 Change, 2018-28
Percent Numeric
Line installers and repairers 242,200 252,900 4 10,700
  Electrical power-line installers and repairers 119,400 128,900 8 9,500
  Telecommunications line installers and repairers 122,700 123,900 1 1,200


*Some content used by permission of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

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